Kevin Hogan on Covert Persuasion and Influence


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Kevin Hogan
Network 3000 Publishing
3432 Denmark #108
Eagan, MN 55123
(612) 616-0732








Surprise!
The Power of Interruption

Kevin Hogan


Page 4

A Powerful Tool of Marketing

One of the most useful subsets of interruption and effective tactics in persuasion is surprise. (a.k.a. novelty)

Humans typically are engaged with surprise. It captures and at least temporarily holds our attention and changes the thinking processes that were happening just prior to the surprise.

But just because something is different doesn't make it desirable, likeable or agreeable.

Kevin Hogan on Covert Persuasion and InfluenceFor example, the vast majority of humans tend to filter out information that provides evidence for what they don't believe or agree with. People ignore information that doesn't support their previous conclusions.

So, to get attention, you have to be different, novel, unique.

To get liking and approval, you have to be similar in some fashion. :-)

An interesting conundrum.

Changing Pictures

People want to have the "right words" to say because they tend to think of communication and persuasion in terms of those words, phrases, fragments and being right.

You have a challenge far bigger than words. You must be different enough to gain attention and similar enough to get someone to buy.

We all wish we could pick the right color, say the right word, essentially not have to think, and in so doing make no mistakes and get paid wild amounts of money.

But as you can see, none of that instantly works; so instead we need to understand covert influence theory.

Theory is the evil word in all learning because people are mentally lazy.

"Theory" simply means to have a model based upon observation, experimentation and has the unique value of being falsifiable.

In other words, if you have an idea and it is a theory, you can find out if you are right or wrong.

If someone says something to another person and the person buys their product, the salesperson will likely think it was because of what they said.

Of course that is probably the furthest thing from the truth and they have no idea whether it's provable or not.

That causes just one or two things.

Low income and ultimately, failed results.

Now, here is a neat example of hidden influence that draws on the concept of surprise and interruption. I confess, I never would have thought to study this....



A powerful example of hidden influence? ...



Continue: Page | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 |



Kevin Hogan
Network 3000 Publishing
3432 Denmark #108
Eagan, MN 55123
(612) 616-0732

Photos appear under license with Stockexpert.






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